On the Radio- Removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere


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Heavy air pollution in Tianjin, China (Rich L/flickr)

Eden DeWald | July 16, 2018

This week’s segment explores a study focused on removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Transcript:

Scientists and engineers at Harvard believe they may have found a way to convert carbon dioxide pollution into usable fuel.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The Harvard study explains the process to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at a very low cost — around one-hundred to two-hundred dollars per ton of carbon dioxide. Researchers told the Atlantic magazine this would be a game-changer, because it could mitigate climate change without requiring a shift in lifestyle or a major change in the energy industry.

In a pilot device, researchers were able to turn the atmospheric carbon dioxide into fuels like gasoline. When burned, this carbon-neutral fuel would return back to the atmosphere without adding new greenhouse gases.

The researchers believe they could implement this on an industrial scale by 2021, the Atlantic reported.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E. Mason.

On the Radio: Iowans look to energy policy when choosing presidential candidates


(Daniel Morrison / Flickr)
(Daniel Morrison / Flickr)

July 20, 2015

This week’s On the Radio segment looks at a recent poll that shows Iowans consider energy policies when choosing presidential candidates. Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

Transcript: Iowa Poll on Energy Policy

Iowa voters consider energy production to be a major factor when selecting candidates for the upcoming presidential election.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

An April poll by the Consumer Energy Alliance found that 82 percent of registered Iowa voters said that they consider the energy policies of presidential hopefuls to be a major factor when selecting a candidate. The poll also found that 52 percent of Iowans support offshore drilling for oil in U.S. waters near Alaska, while 32 percent opposed it. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management finds that there are approximately 27 billion barrels of oil and 132 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in the Alaska outer continental shelf.

Proponents of offshore drilling say that it will create jobs and lead to energy independence, while opponents cite environmental concerns with the drilling as well as with the drilling of fossil fuels.

For more information about the poll, visit IowaEnvironmentalFocus.org.

From the UI Center for Global & Regional Environmental Research, I’m Jerry Schnoor.

On the Radio: Soil conservation gains popularity among farmers


An Iowa farm in early Summer (Carl Wycoff / Flickr)
An Iowa farm in early Summer (Carl Wycoff / Flickr)
January 26, 2015

This week’s On the Radio segment looks at a recent report that shows Iowa farmers are increasingly turning to environmentally friendly soil conservation practices. Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

Transcript: Soil Conservation

Cover crops, crop rotation, and other soil conservation practices are gaining in popularity with Iowa farmers, according to a recent report.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The international consulting firm Datu Research released the 53-page report in December which found that 23 percent of those surveyed reported that they planted cover crops on their farms. Eighty percent of respondents said they alternate their fields between corn and soybeans each year while 70 percent of farmers said they practice minimum or conservation tilling practices.

These techniques improve soil health and help to regulate moisture content. This allows soil to retain more nitrate and phosphorus, saving farmers on fertilizer costs while also reducing nutrient runoff which is a major cause of water pollution in Iowa.

Agricultural runoff accounts for approximately 70 percent of the nitrogen and phosphorus that enters the Gulf of Mexico through the Mississippi River.

For more information about this report this IowaEnvironmentalFocus.org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Jerry Schnoor.

On the Radio: Urban Wetland Projects


Photo by Sustainable Sanitation; Flickr

This week’s On the Radio segment covers the benefits of urban wetland projects. Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

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On the Radio: Green Jobs in Iowa


Photo by Carl Wycoff; Flickr

This week’s On the Radio segment covers the environmental report “A Green Greater Des Moines.” Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

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On the Radio: Cover Crops Work


 

Photo by NRCS Soil Health; Flickr

This week’s On the Radio segment covers the success of cover crop practices in conservation farming. Listen to the audio below or continue reading for the transcript.

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On the Radio: Funds for Water Quality Practices


Photo by eutrophication&hypoxia; Flickr

This week’s On the Radio segment covers a statewide, monetary incentive program that will help cut down on the pollution caused by field runoff. Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

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