U.N. official pushes for faster, better climate efforts


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The United Nations headquarters in New York City (wikimedia.commons).

Julia Poska| September 13th, 2018

United Nations Secretary General António Guterres called on global leaders to ramp up their Paris Accord commitments and to do it soon in a speech he gave September 10 at the U.N. headquarters in New York.

“If we do not change course by 2020, we risk missing the point where we can avoid runaway climate change, with disastrous consequences for people and all the natural systems that sustain us,” he said, as quoted in Al Jazeera.

Guterres pointed to record-breaking temperatures and devastating natural disasters like Hurricane Maria as evidence that climate change is outpacing human efforts to reduce it. He called on leaders outside of national government, like industry leaders and local officials, to take initiative as well.

The U.N Paris Accord, signed by almost 200 countries, aims to keep global temperatures at least 2 degrees Celsius below a pre-industrial baseline by the end of the century.  2020.  As of right now, many countries are not on track to meet these targets. Even if the Accord met its full potential, many critics argue the reductions it outlines would not actually meet the 2 degree mark.

Guterres spoke of the agreement, saying “What we still lack, even after the Paris Agreement, is leadership and the ambition to do what is needed,” as quoted in the New York Times. He asked leaders to step up and meet their Paris Accord promises to show citizens of their countries they “care about the people whose fate they hold in their hands.”

The next U.N climate summit, COP24, will be held in Poland this December. At this summit, world leaders who have heeded Guterres’ warning will have the opportunity to announce plans to increase their fossil fuel emission reduction targets.

Animal protection remains popular and economical


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Otters and other animals have been protected by the Endangered Species Act since the law began in 1973. (Mike Baird/Wikipedia)

Katelyn Weisbrod | July 26, 2018

Adorable otters, majestic bald eagles, and fearsome gray wolves are not the only things at stake as the Trump administration considers revisions to the Endangered Species Act.

The law, passed in 1973, aims to protect a list of species with critically low population sizes. The revision to the law proposes considering economic costs when making decisions about protection of endangered species.

Time Magazine reported this week the many economic benefits of protecting America’s wildlife. These animals contribute to a broader, delicate ecosystem that can have serious implications if altered. The National Fish and Wildlife foundation reported in 2011 that ecosystem services in the contiguous U.S. contribute to 10 percent of the country’s gross-domestic product. Activities like hunting, fishing, and wildlife watching amount to millions of dollars every year in retail sales and tax revenue, according to the same report.

Although the costs of protecting wildlife are real, Time reported, the implications hit corporations the hardest rather than the country as a whole. In 2015, four out of five Americans supported the law, PBS News Hour found.

On The Radio – Energy consumption at Google


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Google

Kasey Dresser | May 21, 2018

This weeks segment looks at how Google was able to reuse more than 100% of the energy they consumed in 2017. 

Transcript:

Google has become one of the biggest corporate buyers of renewable energy.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The massive company planned to get 100% of their energy from renewable sources in 2017. At the end of the year, they exceeded that goal.

Google currently holds contracts to buy 3 gigawatts of renewable energy from a wind farm specifically built to power the corporation’s offices and satellite locations globally. The purchase is the largest investment in renewable energy by a corporation to date, making Google a top customer of green energy.

For 2017, the company ended up investing in and generating more green energy than it consumed, a cycle that keeps a steady supply of energy on hand. Google’s Senior Vice President Urs Holzle explained that they were working on over 25 green energy projects around the globe.

Other large companies are following in Google’s footsteps by investing in renewable sources.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus dot org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone

Pew research survey reveals U.S. climate change views


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Nearly ninety percent of respondents to a recent survey supported further development of solar energy systems. (Oregon Department of Transportation/flickr)

Jenna Ladd | May 17, 2018

A recent Pew Research Center survey details how U.S. residents perceive both the effects of climate change and the federal government’s response to it.

The national survey, which was administered during March and April 2018 to 2,541 adults, found that six in ten people living in the U.S. say that climate change is affecting their local community. Differences were observed by political leanings, with 76 percent of Democrats saying that climate change is affecting their local community and about 35 percent of Republicans responding in the same way. Political party was not the only differentiating factor, however. Respondents also differed in their perceptions based on distance from the coasts. People that live within 25 miles of a coast were 17 percent more likely than those that live more than 300 miles from the coast to say that climate change was affecting their local community.

Regardless of whether respondents believe that climate change is affecting their community, a majority (67%) of respondents agreed that the federal government is not doing enough to combat climate change.

So, what climate-smart policies were respondents in support of? Seventy-two percent of participants supported efforts to further protect the environment from energy use and development. Similarly, 71 percent said they would like to increase reliance on renewable energy. Solar panels (89%) and wind turbines (85%) received overwhelming support from respondents, regardless of political affiliation.

This survey’s results reflect responses from a similar Pew research survey administered in 2016.

On The Radio- Changing fuel emissions standards


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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt

Kasey Dresser | May 14, 2018

This weeks segment looks at the EPA’s reevaluation of America’s fuel efficiency standards. 

Transcript: 

The EPA is reevaluating the national fuel efficiency standard for American automakers.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

As a result of the Clean Air Act, auto manufacturers have been required to increase the fuel efficiency of their vehicles. One third of states are required to operate under California’s strict emissions standards and the remaining two thirds operate under a less strict standard.

The Obama administration set a target goal of 54.5 miles per gallon by the year 2025. EPA director, Scott Pruitt is currently proposing a new lesser national standard. This proposition has evoked debate from all sides. 

California officials have announced they are not ready to drop their stricter standards. Financial advisors are worried weakening fuel economy would affect the U.S.’ stature in the auto industry. Automakers are worried they may not meet the Clean Air Act’s goal. 

Other politicians are concerned that if only one third of states are required to follow the California standard that might result in less fuel efficient cars being released in the remaining states.

At this point no changes have been made but the discussion continues.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On The Radio- Solar Energy


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Solar energy harnesses the natural energy of the sun to produce electricity. (Georgia Business/flickr)

Kasey Dresser | May 7, 2018

This weeks segment looks at activity in the solar energy industry during the first quarter of the year.

Transcript:

The worldwide solar energy industry is booming in 2018.   

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Renewable solar energy is a growing market with a 2.9 trillion dollar increase since 2004. Clean Technica, a solar energy company, recently released a report of all major changes in the solar energy industry in the first quarter of 2018. Here are some of the highlights:

India has had the biggest increase in spending. They officially broke ground on the largest solar park in the world and announced one billion dollars in assistance to solar powered projects in Africa. 

Recently, President Trump placed tariffs on Chinese solar panels. China currently has the largest solar market investing 86.5 billion dollars last year.

New York was approved for a large scale community solar plant. Community solar power creates electricity for entire neighborhoods and is currently the fast growing solar portion in the US.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

 

A visit with Dr. James Hansen discussing his relationship with Dr. Van Allen


 

Kasey Dresser | May 4, 2018

The University of Iowa was very lucky to receive a visit from scientist, researcher, and adjunct professor Dr. James Hansen. He was gracious enough to sit down with us and interview. Today’s video talks about his relationship with Dr. Van Allen.