On The Radio–The 4th national Climate Change Assessment


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Scientists discuss methods of helping the environment in the recent assessment. (flickr)

Natalia Welzenbach-Marcu | January 1st, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses the recently released Climate Change Assessment.

Transcript: In early December, the first draft of the 4th national climate change assessment was released.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The National Climate Change Assessment comes out every four years. The goal of the assessment is to update the scientific community’s understanding of climate change, and suggest solutions on how to adapt to these changes.

The two biggest issues highlighted in the statement that will affect Iowa are increases in humidity and temperature.

The temperature of the Gulf of Mexico is rising. This is creating warmer and moister water vapor which is being pushed to the Midwest because of high pressure from the east and low pressure from the west. The exaggerated northward flow of moisture to the Midwest is increasing precipitation, creating more overall humidity, and more extreme rainfall in the late spring and early summer.

The Midwest’s average temperature has gone up 1.2 degrees since 1990, and is predicted to have the highest temperature increase in the country by mid-century. This will create challenges for the pollination cycle for the crops, forest health, and other ecosystems.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

 

On The Radio – September 2017 record-setting month for hurricanes


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Hurricane Maria churning over the Atlantic Ocean. (NASA)
Jenna Ladd | October 23, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses the unprecedented severity of hurricane activity in the Atlantic ocean this September. 

Transcript: September 2017 was a record-setting month for hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

It is common for September to be the most active month for hurricanes because low pressure systems often move across the Atlantic and meet the tropical waters of the Caribbean during that month, but September 2017 was a cut above the rest.

The beginning of September brought Hurricane Harvey, a category four storm which caused unprecedented damage to, Houston, the U.S.’s fourth largest city. Five additional hurricanes left paths of destruction across the Caribbean and Florida during September, with Irma and Maria both reaching category five status.

Last month, the overall intensity and duration of storms, known as “accumulated cyclone energy,” was 175 units, significantly higher than September 2014’s record of 155 units. While climate change has not been found to cause hurricanes, there is evidence to say that rising sea temperatures make them stronger.

For more information, visit Iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org. From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On The Radio – Petition to strengthen regulation for livestock operations denied


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A confined dairy feeding lot in northeastern Iowa. (Iowa State Univesity)
Jenna Ladd | October 16, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses how a recent attempt to strengthen regulatory standards for livestock facilities in Iowa was shut down by the Iowa Environmental Protection Commission. 

Transcript: A petition to make it more difficult to build animal feeding operations in the state of Iowa was recently denied by the Iowa Environmental Protection Commission.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Under current law, applicants seeking to construct livestock facilities must meet only 50 percent of the state’s master matrix of rules and regulations pertaining to the structures. The petition, filed by two environmental groups, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement and Food & Water Watch, requested that applicants meet at least 86 percent of the matrix’s requirements.

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources sided with the Iowa Environmental Protection Commission and recommended against passing the petition, both groups said that the proposed changes would be too stringent. Proponents of the petition pointed out that just two percent of applicants are denied permission to construct livestock feeding operations in the state of Iowa.

The current animal feeding operation master matrix was developed fifteen years ago by state lawmakers.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On The Radio – Global sand shortage presents environmental problems


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What was once a sand mine sits abandoned in Rangkasbitun, Indonesia. (Purnadi Phan/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| August 21, 2017
This week’s On The Radio segment discusses how the international sand shortage is leading to the degradation of waterways.

Transcript: A global sand shortage is having detrimental impacts on waterways.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The demand for sand has skyrocketed in recent years due to rapid urbanization worldwide. Sand is used to make the concrete and asphalt for every new building, road, and residence. More than thirteen billion tons of sand were mined for construction last year, with 70 percent going to Asia.

At present, sand is being extracted too fast for natural systems to replenish. To keep pace with exploding demand, sand miners are dredging lakes and rivers, chipping away at coastlines and destroying entire small islands. Sand extraction in rivers often deepens the channel, making bank erosion more likely. Similarly, when miners remove sediments, they often also remove plant life, which can have adverse impacts on aquatic food chains.

More wealthy western countries are beginning to use sand alternatives. For example, asphalt and concrete can be recycled and crushed rock can be used instead of sand in some cases.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org. From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On The Radio – New science curriculum being developed for students in Iowa


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Teachers work in small groups to develop curriculum plans that align with Iowa’s new science standards. (Left to right: Taylor Schlicher, Southeast Junior High; Zach Miller, University of Iowa MAT Science Education; Susanna Ziemer, University of Iowa MAT Science Education; Ted Neal, Clinical Instructor, University of Iowa; Courtney Van Wyk, Pella Christian Grade School; Stacey DeCoster; Grinnell Middle School)
Jake Slobe| July 17, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses the new science curriculum currently being developed for students in Iowa.

Transcript: Science teachers from around the state gathered at the University of Iowa Lindquist Center late last month to develop new curriculum for eighth grade students.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The working group was hosted by the Iowa K-12 Climate Science Education Initiative, a combined effort of the UI College of Education and the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research.

The initiative seeks to implement Next Generation Science Standards which were approved by the Iowa Board of Education in 2015. Many of the new standards require students to explore how the Earth’s climate system works. University of Iowa faculty will make some science data available for Iowa students to explore and better understand their local environment.

The seven teachers in attendance worked to develop lesson plans that meet the criteria laid out by the Next Generation Science Standards.

For more information visit iowaenvironmentalfocus.org. From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On the Radio – UI researcher works to understand bicycle fatalities


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Hamann has found that bicycle specific infrastructure, such as bicycle lanes, can help reduce fatalities. (Danielle Scott/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| June 26, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses Dr. Cara Hamann’s research into the increasing number of bicycle fatalities in Iowa.

Transcript: Deaths of Iowa bicyclists have risen by 260 percent in the last four years, and Dr. Cara Hamann of the University of Iowa is working to do something about it.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Hamann, an associate professor of epidemiology at the UI College of Public Health, and her team of researchers explored the relationship between motor vehicle driving behavior and bicycle crashes. The scientists attached GPS and video-recording equipment to bicyclists to capture first-hand data and performed simulations using the National Advanced Driving Simulator, located on the University of Iowa campus.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 3,477 people were killed in bicycle crashes in 2015. Hamann explained that most fatal crashes happen when motor vehicles strike bicyclists.

For more information about Dr. Hamann’s research, visit Iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On The Radio – 38 million pieces of trash found on remote Pacific island


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The most recent recorded density of litter on Henderson Island was 671 items per square meter. (Jennifer Lavers/Associated Press). 
Jenna Ladd| June 19, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses how an extremely remote island in the Pacific ocean bares the highest litter density in the world. 

Transcript: Henderson Island is one of the most remote islands in the world and is also the most affected by pollution from plastic debris.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

When researchers traveled to the tiny, uninhabited island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, they were astonished to find an estimated 38 million pieces of trash washed up on the island.

The island is situated at the edge of the South Pacific gyre, where ocean currents meet in a vortex that captures floating trash, carrying some of it from as far away as Scotland.

Over 99 percent of the debris on the island is made of plastic—most pieces are unidentifiable fragments. The researchers say that fishing-related activities and land-based refuse likely produced most of the debris.

The researchers say the density of trash was the highest recorded anywhere in the world, despite Henderson Island’s extreme remoteness. The island is located about halfway between New Zealand and Chile and is recognized as a UNESCO world heritage site.

To learn more about the island, visit iowaenvironmentalfocus.org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.