On The Radio- Carbon dioxide’s effect on record high temperatures


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Sunrise (flickr/uditha wickramanayaka)

Kasey Dresser| July 8, 2019

This week’s segment looks at the influence of carbon dioxide on the record high-temperature levels this year. 

Transcript: 

Ocean carbon dioxide levels hit a new record early this month, as it was 84 degrees near the Arctic Ocean.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus. 

Temperatures rose to 84 degrees in the northwest of Russian near the entrance of the Arctic Ocean, a rural area in eastern Russia where the average high temperature is around 54 degrees this time of year. 

Many locations around Russia set record high temperatures. This particular heat wave, a manifestation of the arrangement of weather systems and fluctuations in the jet stream, fits into what has been an unusually warm year across the Arctic and most of the mid-latitudes.

In the meantime, the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere surpassed 415 parts per million for the first time in recorded history — the highest in at least 800,000 years, and possibly the highest levels in over 3 million years. Carbon dioxide levels have risen by nearly 50 percent since the Industrial Revolution.

These numbers altogether serve as indicators of the damages done by modern civilization to the environment and the contributions humans have made towards climate change.

For more information, visit Iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org. 

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E. Mason. 

Farms no longer have to report air emissions caused by animal waste


Photo from Pexels.com

By Julia Shanahan | July 5th, 2019

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized a rule that will exempt farms from reporting air emissions caused by animal waste. 

Reporting will still be required for the release of animal waste into water. This exemption is in the form of an amendment to EPCRA section 304, where its main purpose is to alert emergency responders of dangerous emissions, like chemical leaks, so they can potentially evacuate a community or alert locals to seek shelter. In a news release, the EPA said this final rule will ensure that “emergency planners and local responders receive reports that focus on these kinds of emergencies.”

This new rule also applies to decomposing animal waste. All other hazardous emissions above a recommended threshold will still need to be reported. 

Animal waste emissions into the air can increase the risk for respiratory health issues like asthma, and also contribute to climate change. A 2013 report from the UN Food and Agriculture Association said that 7.1 gigatons of CO2 emissions can be attributed to the global livestock sector annually.

Iowa is the country’s leading producer of animal and human waste. The Iowa Environmental Focus reported on research engineer Chris Jones’ March study that calculated how many people each livestock group accounted for in terms of the amount of waste it produces, and called it Iowa’s “real population.”

While Iowa has a population of just over 3 million people, this is what Jones found in his March study and lists in his blog:

  • Iowa hogs: equivalent to 83.7 million people
  • Dairy cattle: 8.6 million people
  • Beef cattle: 25 million people
  • Laying chickens: 15 million people
  • Turkeys: 900,000 people

Iowa DNR cautions boaters this upcoming Fourth of July


Photo by Ethan Sees on Pexels.com

By Julia Shanahan | June 27th, 2019

Due to record rainfall and Iowa waterbodies being at or above flood levels, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources advises individuals who plan to take part in Fourth of July festivities on the water to be cautious.

“Don’t overload your [boat],” said DNR boating law administrator Susan Stocker in a news release. “The U.S. Coast Guard, along with manufacturers, determines the capacity of each boat and it is visible on virtually all boats. Watch for objects at or just below the surface. The rain and runoff may have washed logs or other debris into the water or moved previous obstacles to different locations.” 

Iowa set a record for rain and snow the last 12 months, according to The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. State weather experts say a changing climate and higher ocean temperatures from thousands of miles away contributed to Iowa’s increase in precipitation as well, according to a report from the Des Moines Register.

In May, the Mississippi River near the Quad Cities hit the highest level ever recorded – 22.7 feet.

As the hot summer months continue, Iowa can expect higher than average rainfall. Along with climate change, El Nino conditions over the Pacific Ocean is also a contributing factor. This moisture was also a factor in the major flooding that happened in southwest Iowa and Nebraska in March after snowmelt and rainfall.

For Iowans looking for more information about how to stay safe on a boat this Fourth of July, the DNR has boater education resources online.

On The Radio- Increasing Mass Extinctions


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The Iberian Lynx: a cat species from Spain. There are only a few hundred left in the world. (flickr/Mario Nonaka)

Kasey Dresser| June 24, 2019

This weeks segment looks at how human beings are causing mass extinction of over one million species

Transcript: 

Earths landscapes are changing and about one million species are in danger.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

With the human population passing seven billion, homo sapiens are pushing animals out of the picture in need for more space.

The sharp decline in species is likely to occur by 2050, and it will affect biodiversity. Humans are not the only problem that animals have to face, but global warming as well, a natural result of human treatment towards the environment. 

Nature provides trillions in non-monetized saving that benefits human beings every year. If wildlife and tropical rain forests cease to exist, our medicine would change drastically. Over 23 percent of the planets land area is being harmed because humans are producing more food than ever, causing land degradation. 

Our previous miniscule efforts of creating wild life refuges and efforts to protect individual species will no longer be sufficient.  Scientists have stated that nations need to step up in their efforts to protect natural habitats.  

For more information, visit Iowa environmental focus dot org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E. Mason.

 

 

Climate Change puts dogs at a greater risk for diseases


By Julia Shanahan | June 21st, 2019

While there have been reports that climate change puts humans at a greater risk for contracting infectious diseases, some experts say climate change has contributed to the spread of diseases that can sicken or sometimes kill dogs, according to a report from USA Today.

The report highlighted illnesses in dogs such as vomiting, joint pain, fever, Heartworm disease, and tick-borne illnesses. Lyme disease has also affected dogs all the way through Canada.

These diseases can also be contracted by humans, but dogs and other animals are put at a greater risk because they spend more time outside. Also, because the average global temperature has increased by 1.4 degrees fahrenheit, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, animals are at risk for diseases not only in the summer months, but also in the fall and spring.  

In the USA Today report, Ram Raghavan, a professor of spatial epidemiology at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University who studies tick-borne illnesses and populations in the Midwest, said he believes ticks are expanding their habitats to places where they were never typically found. The changing amounts of rainfall and humidity levels contribute to the expansion of diseases, and in the Midwest, increasing rainfall and flooding have been evident.

The report says the shift in dogs being at risk for disease will be “fast and ugly.” It says that ticks can often carry new viruses and diseases, and with the population expansion, experts are not certain as to exactly what other diseases could potentially spread.


The Center for Disease Control encourages dog owners to do routine veterinary exams, and to make sure children are washing their hands after petting or playing with dogs.

On The Radio- West Nile virus in Iowa


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(flickr/cesar monico)

Kasey Dresser| June 17, 2019

This week’s segment looks at the unwanted guest brought into Iowa by the rain and flooding this season. 

Transcript: 

The West Nile virus may soon run rampant because of the flooding that has been occurring in western Iowa.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Mosquitoes are not abnormal residents in the western region of Iowa. Yet these types of mosquitoes, the Culex tarsalis (Cool-ex tar-say-lis)  is carrying a virus that could hurt human beings.

The Culex tarsalis, have risen in grand numbers because they gather and breed in large pools of water and flooded areas. Iowa State University came out with new research that shows western Iowa has the largest presence of the West Nile virus, due to the resurgence of these mosquitoes.   

Iowa State professor and entomologist Ryan Smith believes that the virus is concerning as it is the common mosquito-born disease in the United States. The virus could affect one in five people bitten by the mosquito, and could lead people to develop fevers and potentially fatal symptoms.

The best way to protect yourself, would be to consistently spray insect repellent or wear long sleeve shirts. Make sure that you are fully covered before stepping outside.

For more information, visit Iowa environmental focus dot org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E. Mason.

 

Plants have been quietly going extinct for centuries


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Two different reports highlight the immense loss in biodiversity in the past few hundred years | Photo by Anthony on Pexels.com

Natalia Welzenbach-Marcu | June 11th, 2019

Environmental changes are impacting our plants, and our shrinking biodiversity is bad news for everyone–according to multiple studies uncovering the loss of a large percentage of our natural world.

A comprehensive UN report released back in May discusses multiple facets of this mass extinction: our accelerating loss of different animal and plant species, our steadily strained biodiversity, the way that our lives hang in balance with a wide variety of plants and animals. Around 1 million plant and animal species are at risk of extinction within the next few hundred years. Multiple factors are at play–including our increased land and water dedication to agriculture, a significant increase in plastic pollution, and unsustainable rates of fishing.

A different report published by researchers at Stockholm University, Kew, and Royal Botanic Gardens detail how over 600 plant species have been confirmed extinct over the past 250 years, a staggering number considering the short window of time in which these extinctions have occurred.

Extinction rates are higher in some locations than in others, with plants of all types at significant risk in Mediterranean climates–anywhere where land-use has changed in any significant way.

The threat of extinction spells disaster for our ecosystem, as many insects and animals depend on a variety of plants to keep them fed and safe. The two reports suggest that–working on a local level upwards–we can eventually reach a point of stabilization and protect many of our remaining plant and animal species, but those that have already left us are never coming back.