Bloomberg visits Iowa for politics, protests and the planet


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Michael Bloomberg in 2008 (Flickr). 

Julia Poska| December 6th, 2018

On a tour to premiere a new film on climate change, multi-billionaire and presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg made three stops this week: New York, London, and Iowa.

The film, titled “Paris to Pittsburg,” is a response to President Trump’s plans to pull out of the 2016 Paris Climate Agreement. It features the efforts of individuals who have taken it upon themselves to fight climate change in the absence of government urgency. Iowans Dan and Faith Lutat of the Iowa Lakes Community College are featured as faces of the college’s wind turbine and energy technology program.

Bloomberg chose to visit Des Moines Tuesday in part to recognize the state’s efforts in renewable energy. He wrote in a Des Moines Register Guest column, “Iowans understand what too many leaders in Washington don’t: Fighting climate change is good for our health and our economy. ” According to him, if every state installed as much wind power as Iowa, the offset carbon emissions would almost bring the U.S. to its Paris Agreement goals for 2025.

He also visited the swing-state to test the waters for a potential run for presidency in 2020. Throughout the day he visited different parts of the state to talk renewable energy and gun control. Well aware of Bloomberg’s political motive, Left-wing protestors joined the screening audience to question the environmentalist’s stance on social issues such as stop-and-frisk  policing and his own billionaire status.

Bloomberg Philanthropies produced the film in partnership with award-winning company Radical Media, and National Geographic will officially broadcast it Dec. 12.

On The Radio- Benefits of passive building design


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Green roof (picture taken off the Sears Tower in Chicago, IL)

Kasey Dresser| December 3, 2018

This weeks segment looks at how implementing passive design can improve energy efficiency. 

Passive design can improve energy efficiency on a warming planet.

As climate change heats up Iowa, how will people stay cool without increasing energy demand? The answer may lie in something called passive design. 

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus. 

Scientists project Iowa heatwaves to become, on average, 7 degrees hotter by mid-century, according the 4th U.S. National Climate Assessment.  About once per decade, a heatwave 13 degrees hotter may occur. 

In such events, people rely heavily on cooling systems. In many cases, this means cranking up the air conditioning, and therefore increasing utility bills and our dependence on fossil fuels.

Passive design techniques include how the building is oriented, window placement, roofing material, tree shading and more. All help maintain comfortable temperatures year round by letting sunlight in and shading it out at the appropriate times.  Tightly sealed insulation minimizes the exchange of air with the outdoors.

Passively designed buildings reduce energy demand and are more comfortable environments to live and work in.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E. Mason.

Midwest school buses go electric


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Four states are using VW settlement money to replace old school buses with modern electric ones (flickr). 

Julia Poska | November 23, 2018

Four midwestern states have secured a total of $20,000 in funding for fully electric school buses and charging stations, funded through settlements with Volkswagen over a 2015 scandal.

Illinois, Ohio, Indiana and Michigan set aside $11, $3, $2.75 and $3 million respectively. The states learned about the importance of decreasing children’s exposure to harmful diesel exhaust fumes during the Environmental Law and Policy Center’s four-state electric schools tour.

School buses are a particularly good candidate for electrification because they idle in front of school buildings for significant periods of time before and after school, releasing a high concentration of emissions in those areas full of children. According to The Lion Electric Company, one maker of such buses, converting one traditional bus to electric keeps 23 tons of greenhouse gases out of the air.

At about $300,000 each,  an electric school bus costs about three times more than a traditional diesel one, according to the ELPC, but savings on diesel and maintenance can total about $12,000 annually. Still, these funds will only provide buses to a few districts in each state.

Iowa explores renewable energy storage


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Batteries can make solar arrays productive even after the sun goes down (flickr).

Julia Poska| November 8, 2018

Already a leader in wind energy, Iowa wants to expand its renewable energy portfolio even further. The Iowa Economic Development Authority granted $200,000 to Ideal Energy in Fairfield last month to study “solar plus” systems, solar arrays enhanced with energy storage capacity via batteries.

Without the addition of batteries, these solar grids would only supply power when the sun was shining. The batteries can supply power during outages and at night, and help “shave” energy bills by supplying energy at peak demand hours, when utility costs are highest.

Ideal Energy is currently building a large, 1.1 megawatt solar array with a 1.1 megawatt hour vanadium flow battery for the Maharishi University of Management in Fairfield. This is the largest solar plus project in the state of Iowa and will cover about a third of the university’s annual energy needs.

Ideal is also installing a somewhat smaller array with a lithium-ion battery at the Agri-Industrial Plastics Company in Fairfield. The battery will provide nighttime power for the company’s 24-hour production lines and save them an estimated $42,000 annually.

With the Iowa Economic Development Authority grant, Ideal will assess and compare the performance, efficiency and maintenance of both systems in partnership with Iowa State University’s Electric Power Research Center. A statewide committee, established by the 2016 Iowa Energy Plan, will evaluate the research to inform future solar plus projects in the state.

 

 

On The Radio- India hoping to open the first fully solar-powered airport


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The arrival gates at Cochin International Airport (Business Television India)

Kasey Dresser | October 29, 2018

This weeks segment looks at prospective plans for India to open the first fully solar-powered airport.

Transcript:

India is set to open the world’s first fully solar-powered airport.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Cocin International Airport is the largest and busiest airport in India’s Kerala state. The transition from traditional electricity to solar power started in 2012, when the price of electricity jumped significantly.

Currently, the airport uses solar panels to generate more than twenty-nine point five megawatts of energy, enough to power the airport with surplus electricity even during the cloudy and rainy monsoon season.

The airport in Cocin is just one example of the growing influence solar power has on India. As much as 10% of expenses in airports come from the amount of electricity used, and implementing more renewable sources of power would help decrease both the carbon footprint and these expenses.

Solar power has been a growing industry in India for some time. The country recently proposed dramatically increasing their solar energy output, proposing to implement enough new panels to generate 100 gigawatts of power. There are some doubts about the ability to meet this goal as India still struggles with its infrastructure.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus dot org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Focus, I’m Sara E Mason.

Iowa ranks #1 for decline in energy efficiency


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Iowa is using energy less efficiently, according to a recent report (flickr).

Julia Poska | October 25, 2018

Iowa’s energy efficiency policy has seen the greatest decline of all U.S. states in 2018, according to a report released earlier this month.

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy pushed Iowa back five spots to #24 on their 2018 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard. The scorecard ranks states based on state policies and programs in six areas: utilities, buildings, transportation, state government, combined heat and power, and appliance standards.

The council attributes Iowa’s downfall to a bill passed in April that caps spending on energy efficiency programs by public utilities and allows customers to opt out of a once-obligatory tax towards such programs. Many have criticized Senate File 2311 for increasing Iowa’s carbon footprint and harming its communities overall.

CGRER member Charles Stanier, associate professor of chemical engineering, explained to the Daily Iowan that spending on energy efficiency benefits all by reducing utility bills for private enterprises and taxpayer-supported buildings, like schools.

“So while the average Iowan puts $60 a year into the program, the money is invested in energy efficiency projects with rapid payback [on average], and they see much more than $60 per year of value throughout Iowa’s economy,” he said.

Iowa may have taken major steps backwards, the majority of states are investing more in energy efficiency. The U.S. as a whole spent $8 billion on energy efficiency programs in 2017, generating enough in savings to power 2.5 million homes for a year.

Most improved is New Jersey, who made it’s way to #8 on the scorecard. The worst state overall for energy efficiency is Wyoming, while Massachusetts is #1.

The Iowa Climate Statement 2018


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Ulrike Passe (left) and Jerry Schnoor answer questions about the Iowa Climate Statement.

Natalia Welzenbach-Marcu and Kasey Dresser | October 11, 2018

The Iowa Climate Statement 2018: Designing Buildings and Communities for Iowa’s Future Climate was released earlier today at the Cedar Rapids Public Library. The statement was announced by Jerry Schnoor, the co-director of the University of Iowa’s Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, and Ulrike Passe, Associate Professor of Architecture at Iowa State University.

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Ulrike Passe (left) and Jerry Schnoor read the climate statement and answered questions

The eighth annual statement, “Iowa Climate Statement 2018: Designing Buildings and Communities for Iowa’s Future Climate,” released Thursday, October 11 was signed by a record 201 science faculty and researchers from 37 Iowa colleges and universities. The statement describes the urgent need to fortify our building and public infrastructure from heat and precipitation and looks to the future weather of Iowa, suggesting ways to improve Iowa’s buildings to suit those changing weather patterns.

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The climate statement holds a record number of signers
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Extreme precipitation is just one factor influencing this year’s climate statement topic

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Watch the press conference on our Facebook page

Read the climate statement