Virtual Event: “Called to Climate Action 2020: Uphold and Upheave!” With Keynote Speaker Harry Smith


Image Via pxfuel

Nicole Welle | October 22, 2020

Iowa Interfaith Power and Light is hosting a virtual event Saturday, October 24th at 10 a.m. that will feature keynote speaker Harry Smith, an NBC news correspondent.

“Called to Climate Action 2020: Uphold and Upheave!” is a faith-based program that will focus on climate awareness, action and leadership in Iowa. In his address, Harry Smith will speak on his call to climate action and talk about his career reporting on environmental stories in the United States and internationally. The event will also include various presentations by Iowa college students who have organized faith-based climate action on their campuses.

Click here to register for the event.

Harry Smith is a graduate of Central College in Pella and has strong ties to Iowa. He hosted morning shows at CBS news for 17 years before joining NBC in 2011, and he has hosted the A&E series “Biography.” He has interviewed world leaders, reported from disaster zones all over the world and reported from the ground during the Iraq War, the war in Bosnia and the Persian Gulf War. He has won an Edward R Murrow Award and several Emmy Awards, according to Iowa IPL’s page.

Smith also recently appeared on Iowa Public Radio where he talked about reporting in the Midwest and his dedication to environmental stewardship. You can listen to that interview here.

Iowa City Climate Fest – Day Four: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle – and Repair


Via Flickr

Nicole Welle | September 24, 2020

The Iowa City Climate Fest kicks off day four today with activities that focus on keeping non-recyclable materials out of recycling bins and repairable items out of landfills.

One in four items sent to recycling centers aren’t recyclable, according to the Iowa City Climate Fest page. To help combat this problem, today’s personal challenge asks people to try out a DIY Home Recycling Audit to check their recycling for misplaced items that frequent Iowa City’s recycling bins. Once people know which materials to look for, they can let their friends and family know to help stop misplaced materials from ending up in local recycling centers.

For today’s community event, locals are encouraged to check out a map of repair resources in and around Iowa City that shows where they can take their damaged goods and appliances that could otherwise end up in the local landfill. Opting to repair damaged items rather than throwing away and replacing them is both good for the environment and a great way to save money. For those who would rather fix their broken items themselves, there is also a virtual Fit-It Fair with instructions on how to do it and a map showing area resources where tools and equipment are available to borrow or rent.

Check out the Iowa City Climate Fest page to learn more about how you can get involved and help celebrate the ways the Iowa City community is doing their part to address climate change.

Iowa City Climate Fest Kicks off This Week


GCRER Co-director Jerry Schnoor discusses the importance of climate action.

Nicole Welle|September 21, 2020

The Iowa City Climate Fest begins today and will celebrate the different ways that our community is coming together to address climate change throughout the week.

There will be no in-person activities this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but the organizers have planned daily personal challenges and virtual community events to keep the celebration going. Details can be accessed through their website. Today’s activities center around celebrating better transportation options, and there will be a knew theme each day.

Local businesses, organizations, and individuals can also get involved by printing off coloring sheets to decorate and hang in windows or submit videos, pictures or posts telling their personal climate action story. Anyone who is interested in taking alternative actions for reducing emissions in Iowa City is also encouraged to check out their Climate Action Toolkit.

How to adapt to climate change​ in Iowa


 

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Jerry Schnoor (right) reading the 2019 Climate Statement at the Cedar Rapids Press Conference

 

Kasey Dresser| February 7, 2020

CGRER’s Co-director Jerry Schnoor sat down with Iowa Public Radio to discuss what life with climate action would like and how Iowans can adapt their own lives with impending climate changes. We have already seen severe flooding and intense preciptations, but what’s next?  You can listen to learn more here.

Amb. Kenneth M. Quinn to retire as World Food Prize President as new year begins


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Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn sits on the right at a World Food Prize event (via Creative Commons). 

Julia Poska | December 11, 2019

Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn brought nutrition and peace to Southeast Asian communities, ending a genocide and serving as Ambassador to Cambodia,  before taking the helm of the World Food Prize Foundation in Des Moines 20 years ago.

He will retire from that position Jan. 3 after decades spent encouraging social and environmental change for the sake of food security.

“What at first seemed an impossible quest, to have the World Food Prize come to be seen as the ‘Nobel Prize for Food and Agriculture,’ has over the last twenty years become a dream come true,” Quinn said in a press release about his retirement.

The World Food Prize honors the vision of Iowan Nobel Peace Prize recipient Norman Borlaug by annually recognizing outstanding achievements in promoting global food security with a $250,000 prize. Borlaug is credited with starting the midcentury “Green Revolution” with a genetically enhanced wheat variety that reportedly saved one billion lives.

As president of the foundation, Quinn promoted  global food security, Borlaug’s vision and the state of Iowa, expanding the reach of the prize, associated ceremony and symposium and WFP education programs around the globe, reaching tens of thousands of people.

He will be replaced by Barbara Stinson, a co-founder and Senior Partner of the non-profit Meridian Institute, which aims to address complex global problems through action and collaboration. A press release on her appointment said that in her over 30 years of environmental public policy experience, she has successfully worked on campaigns to address food safety and climate change’s impact on food production.

 

North Carolina hurricane victims take a lesson from Iowa Flood Center


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Hurricane Florence as seen from space (via flickr). 

Julia Poska| November 15, 2019

A North Carolina mayor hopes to make his city more resilient against flooding following hurricanes using a method he learned from Iowa experts.

At the end of August, the Iowa Flood Center hosted a “flood resilience learning exchange” for 20 scientists, conservationists, farmers and officials from North Carolina communities impacted by devastating flooding from recent hurricanes. The two-day event featured talks from Iowan experts, a tour of Cedar Rapids’ flood infrastructure and a visit to a farm implementing such strategies.

News source kinston.com reported this week that Mayor Dontario Hardy of Kinston, North Carolina had been advocating for increased funding for flood resiliency projects since attending the event almost two months ago.

In just the past few years, Kinston–located along the Neuse River– faced widespread flooding after Hurricanes Matthew (2016) and Florence (2018). Though the Iowa Watershed Approach was not developed with hurricanes in mind, the basic concept–implementing conservation practices on land that will reduce the speed at which precipitation enters and floods our waterways– can apply to all types of flooding.

 

 

2019 Iowa Climate Statement released this Wednesday!


Kasey Dresser| September 16, 2019

Just weeks after July 2019 became the hottest month on record, 212 faculty and researchers from 38 Iowa colleges and universities endorsed the 2019 Iowa Climate Statement: Dangerous Heat Events to Become More Frequent and Severe

The statement released this Wednesday, September 18th, warns Iowans and Midwesterners of formidable extreme heat projections for the region. Tune in for the release of this year’s statement on The UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research Facebook Page at 2pm. 

The UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research has released annual climate statements since 2011. These statements, vetted by hundreds of Iowa’s top experts, place pivotal climate change research into an Iowa-specific context, encouraging preparedness and resilience in the face of the climate crisis.

 

Iowa Flood Center 10 years later: preventative measures for the future


By Julia Shanahan | June 14th, 2019

The Iowa Flood Center celebrated its 10th anniversary on Thursday, where members reflected on the center’s growth and development since the devastating 2008 flooding.

Larry Weber, IFC co-founder and research engineer, said after the 2008 flood, which came just 15 years after another historic flood in 1993, the state of Iowa began to realize that these horrific floods were not just going to be a “once in a lifetime” occurrence.

“Prior to 2008, however, [the Iowa Flood Center] had very little direct impact in the state of Iowa,” Weber told media and community members at the Stanley Hydraulics Lab on Thursday.

Weber said working with the community and government officials during the 2008 flood was a learning experience for many involved, but that it pushed the IFC to be a more resourceful organization ten years later.

With help from the state and IFC, the University of Iowa and surrounding community had to restore damages in 18 buildings. Now, nearly everything has been repaired except for the UI’s Museum of Art. Construction is slated to start this year.

Witold Krajewski, IFC co-founder and rainfall monitoring and forecast expert, said since the 2008 flood, the IFC has mapped areas around streams and rivers that are exposed to innovation and monitors streamflow forecasts in real-time at about 400 locations across the state – all of which are available on an interactive web-based platform.

“While today we are celebrating ten years of accomplishments, we and the people of Iowa have a long road ahead of [us] to a sustainable future,” Krajewski said, referencing concerns about climate change, intensifying land use, and beginning new approaches to hazard-assessment programs.

IFC members also highlighted the role state government has played in restoring communities hit by flooding. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds has signed disaster proclamations for more than half the state in recent months after the Missouri River flooded in southwest Iowa.

State Senators Rob Hogg, D-Cedar Rapids, and Joe Bolkcom, D-Iowa City, commended the bipartisanship in the Iowa Legislature and the devotion of community members and Iowans who pitched in to help in 2008.

Hogg said 11 years ago on the night of June 12, thousands of Iowans showed up to help safeguard the final water intake in Cedar Rapids by laying down sand bags into the morning hours of June 13. He said after an overflow of people showed up to help, some were sent to secure Mercy Medical Center to prevent its bottom level from collapsing.

“I have said since that time that when it comes to preventing future flooding, we need that same spirit of the sandbag that we displayed on June 12 and 13 of 2008,” Hogg said.

Hogg said that today, the “spirit of the sandbag” can be applied to building detention basins, flood-safe architecture, and conservation efforts on farmlands.

On The Radio- The first- ever photograph of a black hole


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Powehi is a Hawaiian phrase meaning “embellished dark source of unending creation.” (CNN)

Kasey Dresser| May 6, 2019

This weeks segment looks at what space technology research can also teach us about the earth.

Transcript:

Our obsession with outer space is helping us understand our Earthly environment.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The recently unveiled, first-ever photograph of a black hole captured imaginations. The black hole–now christened “Powehi” –was actually photographed in April 2017, but the image was just released this year. Taking the image required eight telescopes from around the world.

Telescopes, satellites, and other space-age technology have helped us explore the far reaches of our solar system–and have given us a way to truly analyze and map our climate from above.

The data collected from orbiting satellites has helped climate scientists for decades. Satellite data helped us discover the hole in our ozone layer in 1985. Some satellites are specifically launched to monitor ice caps, track sea levels, and measure the amount of CO2 in our atmosphere. 

Many tools used for monitoring our climate today are modeled after space technology, and the research and development of tools that help us leave our atmosphere will also help us understand our planet.

For more information, visit Iowa Environmental Focus dot org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Sara E Mason.

Celebrate Earth Day in Iowa!


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The Earth is worth celebrating! 

Julia Poska| April 18, 2019

On April 22, people around the world celebrate Earth Day, spending time cleaning, greening and appreciating the life-giving planet we too often take for granted.

Iowa, of course, will join in on the party. Read below about Earth Day events cities in Iowa will host next week, as well as some activities you can do individually to make a difference.

Des Moines: Festivities in the state capital will begin this weekend. On Friday, Des Moines Parks and Recreation will host an Earth Day Trash Bash, where registered teams will pick up trash around the city. Everyone is welcome to join in on the kick-off party and several other events hosted Friday and Saturday as part of the bash, including a Downtown Earth Day Tour through the science center, botanical garden and riverwalk. A number of other events  on Saturday and Monday include wildlife restoration, crafting and stream cleanup.

Cedar Rapids: The city’s 10th annual EcoFest will be on Saturday, April 20. The day’s events include performances, presentations, hands-on activities, tours, awards and more. Last year over 4,000 people attended!

Dubuque: The Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium will participate in a nationwide Party for the Planet event Saturday. Visitors attend presentations, meet animals and do hands-on activities to learn about environmental conservation. Participation in the celebration will be included with general admission and free for children 3 and under.

Davenport: Visit the Freight House Farmer’s Market Saturday morning for speakers, demonstrations, music and activities to learn about problems facing the planet and how you can help fight them. 

Iowa City: You can celebrate for days on end in Iowa City! On Monday, compete in Earth Day Eco Trivia at the East Side Recycling Center. Tuesday, celebrate the 100 Grannies for a Livable Future 7th anniversary. Plant trees at the Terry Trueblood Recreation Area Wednesday, and on Friday talk to UI scientists at the Sciences Library. Saturday join Parks and Rec for an Earth Day festival.

University of Iowa student organizations have been hosting Earth Month events for weeks, and still have more to come. Consider visiting the Student Garden Open House Saturday, April 27 for food and DIY Chia Pets with the UI Gardeners and attending an environmental benefit concert the following night with the UI Environmental Coalition.

If you’d like to celebrate on your own or with friends consider these activities:

  • Picking up trash in your neighborhood or at a local park
  • Planting something yummy
  • Starting a home compost pile
  • Going for a nature walk
  • Attempting to make zero-waste for one whole day
  • Cooking a plant-based meal