Rise in toxic algal blooms


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A sign warning swimmers not to take a dip in algae infested waters (Amanda S/flickr)

Eden DeWald | May 30th, 2018

With the first day of summer well on its way, so are toxic algal blooms.

Cyanobacteria, also referred to as blue-green algae, are a type of photosynthetic bacteria that produce microcystin toxins. These pose both short term exposure and a long term exposure threats to humans. Skin contact with microcystin can cause digestion issues, a sore throat and even liver damage. Whereas long term contact can create side effects as serious as cancer and liver damage. Microcystins may cause damage via ingestion or skin contact. Cyanobacteria are not only a danger to humans, and can cause large populations of fish to die off and disrupt aquatic ecosystems.

Cyanobacteria blooms have become a growing threat for waterways in the United States. The amount of blooms has grown substantially even in the past few years according to the Environmental Working Group, which saw a rise from three self reported algal blooms in 2010, to 169 reported blooms in 2017. 

The Environmental Protection Agency sites commonly used fertilizers nitrogen and phosphorus as causes for these algal blooms. When excess fertilizer runs off and finds its way into a waterway, it can create a dangerous potential home for cyanobacteria which utilizes these elements within its chemical processes.

Potential prevention methods for toxic algal blooms can include approaches such as planting vegetation buffer strips near waterways, and changing the way that fertilizers are applied to crops to prevent excess from being utilized.

 

On The Radio – Global sand shortage presents environmental problems


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What was once a sand mine sits abandoned in Rangkasbitun, Indonesia. (Purnadi Phan/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| August 21, 2017
This week’s On The Radio segment discusses how the international sand shortage is leading to the degradation of waterways.

Transcript: A global sand shortage is having detrimental impacts on waterways.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

The demand for sand has skyrocketed in recent years due to rapid urbanization worldwide. Sand is used to make the concrete and asphalt for every new building, road, and residence. More than thirteen billion tons of sand were mined for construction last year, with 70 percent going to Asia.

At present, sand is being extracted too fast for natural systems to replenish. To keep pace with exploding demand, sand miners are dredging lakes and rivers, chipping away at coastlines and destroying entire small islands. Sand extraction in rivers often deepens the channel, making bank erosion more likely. Similarly, when miners remove sediments, they often also remove plant life, which can have adverse impacts on aquatic food chains.

More wealthy western countries are beginning to use sand alternatives. For example, asphalt and concrete can be recycled and crushed rock can be used instead of sand in some cases.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org. From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

EPA may take over Iowa waterway protection


Photo by cwwycoff1, Flickr.

In response to reports of inadequate enforcement of livestock operations’ regulations, the Environmental Protection Agency has threatened to take over protection of Iowa’s waterways from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

The Iowa DNR argues that the reports don’t suggest negligence, but instead are consistent with their approach of encouraging compliance instead of issuing penalties and punishments.

Read more here.

Environment Iowa’s “10 Scary Facts Plaguing Iowa’s Waterways”


Photo by BLW Photography, Flickr.

For Halloween, Environment Iowa released a list of ten discouraging facts about how Iowa’s waterways are being harmed.

The list includes the increasing number of fish kills in Iowa, the large amounts of phosphorous and nitrogen entering the waterways and the small percentage of animal feeding operations with the required environmental permits.

Read the whole list here.