Federal emergency declaration in Flint to expire soon


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(George Thomas/flickr)
Jenna Ladd | August 11, 2016

The federal state of emergency declared by President Obama for the city of Flint, Michigan will end this Sunday, August 14.

President Obama announced the state of emergency on January 16, 2016 after thousands of Flint residents were exposed to toxic amounts of lead in tap water. The declaration authorized the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to spend up to 5 million in federal money to supply the community with clean water, water filters, and other necessary items. Since January, FEMA has covered 75% of costs associated with providing more than 243,000 water filter replacement cartridges, and about 50,000 water and pitcher filters. After the emergency status ends this Sunday, the state government will be responsible for those costs.

Bob Kaplan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Acting Regional Administrator, said that while water quality is improving, their work is far from finished, he said, “We won’t be at the finish line until testing can confirm that Flint residents are receiving safe, clean drinking water.”

Researchers at Virginia Tech University spent two weeks in the Michigan city at the end of June testing water samples for lead, iron, and Legionella, a bacteria that causes Legionnaire’s disease and responsible for the deaths of ten Flint citizens. In a press conference today, the research team concluded that Legionella colonization was very low, and while lead levels have decreased, Flint citizens should still use filters or bottled water until further notice from the State or EPA.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver said that rebuilding Flint citizens’ trust in the government is going to require more support from government agencies. She said, “We don’t think we’ve gotten everything that the citizens deserve as a result of what has happened…It hasn’t been enough and it hasn’t been fast enough.” Weaver added, “…the only way people will truly feel comfortable is when we have new pipes in place.”

Study links contaminants from rural well water to birth defects


(Darin/Flickr)
(Darin/Flickr)
Nick Fetty | May 4, 2016

Water contaminants found in some rural agricultural areas could be linked to birth defects in pregnant women, according to a recent study co-authored by a University of Iowa researcher.

Peter Weyer, associate director of the Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination at the UI, along with Jean Brender, professor emeritus at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, studied water sources for pregnant women in rural areas of Iowa and Texas. The researchers found the presence of atrazine, nitrate and arsenic in well water samples.

Nitrate, commonly used in fertilizer, has been linked to neural tube defects, oral clefts, and limb deficiencies while atrazine, also used in fertilizer, can cause abdominal defects and gastroschisis. Arsenic contamination was found to be more of an issue in Texas where it seeps into water sources through the bedrock and if consumed by pregnant women can cause developmental problems in fetuses. While each of these compounds individually have been tied to birth defects and other health complications, the effects are unclear when two or more of these compounds are found in a single water source.

This recent study builds on work published by Weyer and Brender in 2013. Their 2013 study looked specifically at nitrate pollution in water and its links to birth defects. The researchers studied water sources for pregnant women in Iowa and Texas and used data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

In both studies, the researchers recommend that before becoming pregnant, women should have wells tested for contaminants. If contaminants are found in a well women should consider other sources such as bottled water.

 

Iowa State Senator Joe Bolkcom talks environment, agriculture


Iowa State Senator Joe Bolkcom presented for the University of Iowa Environmental Coalition on Lecture Series at the Iowa Memorial Union on Thursday, November 20. (Photo by Nick Fetty)
Iowa State Senator Joe Bolkcom presented for the University of Iowa Environmental Coalition Lecture Series at the Iowa Memorial Union on Thursday, November 20. (Photo by Nick Fetty)

Nick Fetty | November 21, 2014

Iowa State Senator Joe Bolkcom discussed environmental issues affecting Iowans as part of the montly University of Iowa Environmental Coalition Lecture Series Thurday night in the Iowa Memorial Union.

Bolkcom – who also serves as the Outreach and Community Education Director for the UI’s Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research as well as the Iowa Flood Center – highlighted issues that farmers face with climate change in a state where agriculture drives the local economy.

“Keeping soil where it is is one of our top, if not our top challenge economically, water quality wise, and to address climate,” Bolkcom said.

By “keeping our soil” he is referred to runoff of topsoil which has been exacerbated by extreme weather events. Topsoil runoff and poor fertilizer application practices has also lead to increased pollution in Iowa waterways.

“The challenge for Iowa is we haven’t had the resources and when we have had the resources, we’ve not made the investments,” he said “If you want ag producers to do more conservation we have to come up with some more resources.”

Bolkcom said the state appropriated $4 million this year for resources to address topsoil runoff though more money will likely be necessary to fully correct the issue. He said the state legislature recently changed the state constitution so that next time there is a sale tax increase, three-eighths of a cent would go toward a fund to address environmental issues. Roughly 70 percent of Iowans expressed support for this environmental protection fund which is expected to generate about $150 million per year. Even though the state has not yet raised the three-eighths of a cent, Bolkcom said it would be a “game-changing investment.”

“It would create a bunch of jobs and it would start the work of cleaning up Iowa’s rivers, lakes, [and] streams,” he said. “It would start the work of putting together the kind of infrastructure on farms that we need because it’s going to take 10 or 20 years and our work’s never done.”

In addition to environmental issues affecting farmers, Bolkcom also discussed renewable energy.

“On the mitigation side its about trying to think about ways to produce energy more efficiently and in environmentally sound ways,” he said.

The wind energy industry is strong in Iowa and there has been a recent increase in solar energy as well. However Bolkcom said more can be done to embrace solar energy in the Hawkeye State.

“We’re kind of behind a number of other states. We’re behind a bunch of other countries in terms of the implementation of more solar technology,” he said.

Currently there are tax credits available at both the state and federal level to help businesses and individuals subsidize the cost for installing solar panels. The federal tax credit covers 30 percent of the cost while the state credit is 15 percent. However the federal credit is scheduled to expire at the end of 2016. Bolkcom said at this point its unclear whether the federal credit will be extended beyond 2016 which also leaves the future of the state-level credit uncertain.

“It’s not clear. Will the federal credits be extended? Don’t know. Can Iowa extend its credit in the absence of a federal credit? Yes, it would just be worth less money if it’s just Iowa’s credit but it might still be worth doing” he said, adding that this past year funding was boosted by $3 million.

Bolkcom concluded his lecture by returning to the topic of climate change. He said further focus on and acceptance of the effects of climate change are crucial for the future of Iowa.

“We’ve had this kind of debate where 50 percent of the time is for the 98 scientists that say we’ve got a big problem on our hands and 50 percent of the time to the two scientists that say no we don’t. So I’m fatigued by that and it’s time to move on.”

For more information about Thursday night’s lecture check out The Daily Iowan.

Study: Vitamin B12 may be key to removing PCBs, other toxins released into environment


Researchers at the University of Manchester may have found a way to remove PCBs and other toxins from the environment (Flickr/Seth Anderson)
Researchers at the University of Manchester may have found a way to remove PCBs and other toxins from the environment (Flickr/Seth Anderson)

Nick Fetty | October 21, 2014

A 15-year study by researchers at the University of Manchester finds that vitimin B12 could be the key to removing PCBs and other harmful pollutants already released into the environment.

“We already know that some of the most toxic pollutants contain halogen atoms and that most biological systems simply don’t know how to deal with these molecules,” University of Manchester professor David Leys said in a press release. “However, there are some organisms that can remove these halogen atoms using vitamin B12. Our research has identified that they use vitamin B12 in a very different way to how we currently understand it.”

The team from the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology used x-ray crystallography to study 3D models of how halogen atoms are removed from organisms. These particular organisms are “microscopic deep sea creatures” which are also found in rivers and ponds.

While humans use vitamin B12 to maintain a functioning brain and nervous system, certain micro-organisms and bacterium are able to use it as a detoxifying agent. The rapid reproduction rate of these bacterium means they can remove “a huge quantity of chemical in a few weeks.”

Often times these toxins pollute the air and the water through direct disposal onto land and waterways as well as through burning household waste.

The study was published this month in the journal Nature. The project was made possible with funding from the European Research Council.

EPA awards Oskaloosa $400K grant


Nick Fetty | August 12, 2014
Swans swim on a pond near Forest Cemetery in Oskaloosa. (Aaron McIntyre/Fickr)
Swans swim on a pond at Forest Cemetery in Oskaloosa. (Aaron McIntyre/Fickr)

The Iowa city of Oskaloosa has been awarded a $400,000 grant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency which will be used to “to help eliminate waste and hazardous materials.”

The city was awarded the Brownfield Assessment Grant which aims “to empower states, communities, and other stakeholders to work together in a timely manner to prevent, assess, successfully clean up, and reuse brownfields.” Brownfields are properties, expansions, developments, or reuses which may be compromised by the presence or suspected presence of hazardous pollutants, substances, or other contaminants. Officials with the City of Oskaloosa will seek public input for determining the community’s most polluted sites.

The grant is broken down into two categories: $200,000 for hazardous substances and $200,000 for petroleum specifically. An EPA study found that the grant has helped to improve residential property values by 5.1 percent to 12.8 percent near brownfields that were assessed or cleaned up. Since June of 2013, Brownfield Assessment Grants have made nearly 45,000 acres of land available for reuse while also leveraging 97,500 jobs. Oskaloosa – a town of about 11,463 located roughly 60 miles southeast of Des Moines – was the only place in the state to apply for and be awarded this grant for the fiscal year.

For more information about this project, contact the Oskaloosa Public Works Department at 641-673-7472 or visit www.epa.gov/brownfields.

Iowa could soon face water situation similar to Toledo


Nick Fetty | August 7, 2014
Blue green algae growing on Lake Eric. ( NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory/Flickr)
Blue green algae growing on Lake Erie. (NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory/Flickr)

Algae blooms in Iowa could contaminate the water supply, similar to what recently happened in Toledo, and according to one expert, “it’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when.”

High levels of nitrogen and phosphorus inundate Iowa waterways and that coupled with high temperatures provides the perfect breeding ground for algae. The state has implemented a voluntary plan which encourages farmers to practice agricultural techniques that will lessen the amount of fertilizer run-off which leads to contaminated waterways in Iowa.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently advised beach-goers to avoid the waters at Lake Red Rock in Marion County due to excessively high levels of blue green algae which is known to contain toxins that are harmful to humans and can be lethal for animals. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources advises swimmers to take extra precaution in Iowa lakes during this time of the year. There are currently about dozen state-operated beaches in Iowa where swimming is not advised.

Attornys general from Iowa and 14 other agricultural and ranching states have spoken out against a recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed rule for the Clean Water Act, fearing the proposal would place excessive regulations on farmers and ranchers. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy has defended the proposal and said it does not intend to place strict federal regulations on farmers.

Approximately 600 households in southwest Iowa were recently issued a boil order before consuming tap water after water quality tests concluded that chlorine levels were not sufficient. Chlorine is used to kill bacteria and other harmful toxins as part of the water filtration process but there was no indication that bacteria or other toxins had actually contaminated the water supply.

On the Radio: Water Quality Research


Photo by BugDNA; Flickr

This week’s On the Radio segment covers water quality research being done at the University of Iowa. Listen to the audio below, or continue reading for the transcript.

Continue reading

“Hog Wild: Factory Farms are Poisoning Iowa’s Drinking Water”


Photo courtesy of Farm Sanctuary; Flickr

Ted Genoways goes into an in-depth analysis concerning the issues of farm runoff polluting Iowa’s drinking water.

“Millions of pigs are crammed into overcrowded barns all across the state, being fattened for slaughter while breeding superbugs—all to feed China’s growing appetite for Spam”

Follow this link to read the full story via On Earth. 

Environment Iowa Delivers Petition to Protect Iowa Rivers


Photo by cwwycoff1; Flickr

 

Environment Iowa delivered a petition with over 5,000 signatures to Senator Dick Dearden, chair of the Natural Resources committee. The petition calls on Iowa leaders to reduce runoff pollution from corporate agribusiness.

Environment Iowa is a non-profit, statewide, environmental advocacy program. To learn more about the petition and Environment Iowa, follow this link.

CR water treatment facility announces new flood protection system


The Cedar River during the flood of 2008. Photo by gmzflickr; Flickr
The Cedar River during the flood of 2008. Photo by gmzflickr; Flickr

The Water Pollution Control Facility of Cedar Rapids announced plans to build a $21 million flood protection system including berms, a flood wall, and a pump station. Continue reading