May 2018 is the warmest on record


8341.png
NOAA details notable climate events for May 2018 (NOAA)

Eden DeWald | June 6th, 2018

May 2018 is the warmest month of May ever recorded in the United States according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It broke the long held record, which was set back in 1934, during the Dust Bowl. The average temperature recorded in May 2018 was 65.4 degrees, compared to the 64.7 degree average from May 1934.

However, temperatures didn’t just increase on the average, 8,590 daily record breaking highs were set across the United States. Including a notable 100 degree temperature spike for Minneapolis on May 28th, which is the earliest date that a triple digit temperate has been reached for Minneapolis.

Precipitation records for May 2018 also paint a curious picture. The May 2018 average precipitation of 2.97 inches is slightly above the general May average of 2.91 inches. However, more than one-fourth of the United States landmass were under drought conditions. Some areas even experienced record breaking precipitation, such as Florida and Maryland. This data aligns with recent information from NASA, which foresees wet areas getting wetter and dry areas becoming drier due to a combination of human impact, natural water cycles, and climate change.

 

 

On the Radio: Warmer temperatures linked to increased rainfall


Photo by iowa_spirit_walker, Flickr.
Photo by iowa_spirit_walker, Flickr.

Listen to this week’s radio segment here or read the transcript below. This week’s segment discusses the connection between warmer temperatures and increased rainfall.

A University of Iowa study shows an increase in heavy rainfall is connected to increased temperatures in the upper Midwest.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Continue reading

High temperatures force early dismissals at Iowa schools


Photo by woodleywonderworks, Flickr.

This year’s unusually warm summer continues to affect Iowans.

Schools around the state have been forced to dismiss students early during some of the hotter days. On Thursday, 50 Iowa schools ended early.

As long as the school day last for 5.5 hours, schools do not have to make up for the lost class time. However, with the frequency that some schools have had early dismissal this month, students will lose substantial schooling if no school days are added.

Read more from The Gazette here.