2016 ranks third wettest ‘water year’ since 1872


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Each bi-weekly Water Summary Update provides the current status of water resources in Iowa in terms of precipitation, stream flow, shallow groundwater, and drought monitoring. (Iowa DNR)
Jenna Ladd | October 14, 2016

Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) released its most current Water Summary Update earlier this week.

DNR prepares the bi-weekly updates in collaboration with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, the U.S. Geological Survey, and The Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Division. Each report provides an overview of the status of Iowa’s water resources and significant events that affect water supplies using four categories: precipitation, stream flow, shallow groundwater, and drought monitoring.

The most recent update is a snapshot of the state’s water resources from August 31st through October 10th. The report notes that different parts of Iowa experienced a wide range of rainfall totals. Heavy rains pelted the Cedar River watershed during much of September, with the largest storm-total rainfall of 10.56 inches near Nora Springs in Floyd County. In contrast, some parts of southeastern Iowa experienced a particularly dry September. Most notably, rain totals were less than one-third of the average near Fairfield and Ottumwa. Average statewide rainfall was 6.29 inches or 2.91 inches above average, making it the rainiest September since 1986.

Streamflow was also reported to be above average for much of the state. The update notes that U.S. Geological Survey employees have been taking additional streamflow measurements following heavy rain events at the end of September in the Cedar and Wapsipinicon River basins. In several locations along the Shell Rock, Cedar, and Wapsipinicon Rivers, peak stream flow was found to be the second-highest in recorded history. These values are only topped by the historic 2008 flood.

October 1st through September 30th is considered the “water year” by experts in the field. The 2016 Water Year, which ended on September 30th, 2016, is the third wettest year on record in 144 years.

Several stream gauges shut down around Iowa


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The U.S.G.S. provides realtime streamflow compared to historical streamflow for each day of the year (U.S.G.S.)
Jenna Ladd | July 13, 2016

Several U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) stream gauges around Iowa were deactivated this month, according to The Gazette of Cedar Rapids. The gauges were initially installed after major floods in 2010 and 2012. Since then, they have cost about 2 million a year to maintain, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Their primary function is to measure the level of the river water and the volume of the water passing through in cubic feet per second.

Many Iowans are concerned about the impacts the deactivation of these gauges may have on accurate and timely predictions of major floods. When recalling the devastating flood of the Wapsipinicon River in 2008, Brenda Leonard, Jones County Emergency Coordinator, says that a warning like those given by river gauges would have been extremely helpful for the community of Anamosa.

While the budget for stream gauges has not been reduced, the cost associated with maintaining them has risen in recent years. In efforts to keep the gauges in service, public and private funding partners have come forward for the Turkey River in Spillville, the Cedar River in Cedar Bluff and the West Nishnabotna and East Nishnabotna rivers near Riverton.

Deactivated gauges in Eastern Iowa include the Volga River in Fayette, the North Fork Maquoketa River below Bear Creek at Dyersville, the Wapsipinicon River in Oxford Mills, the Cedar River in Osage, the Shell Rock River near Rockford and Indian Creek in Marion.

Increase of earthquakes in the U.S. during the past three years linked to fracking wells


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Photo by Leda Kat; Flickr

A recent study conducted by seismologists and geologists has proved that there is a strong positive correlation between waste-water wells and quakes. In the past three years alone, earthquakes in the U.S. have become five times more common than in previous years. Continue reading

On the Radio: Iowa could lose crucial flood aid tools


 

2008 Iowa City flooding. Photo by Bethany Byers.

 

Listen to this week’s radio piece here.  It discusses the potential loss of some of Iowa’s crucial flood prevention tools.  Read the transcript below:

Towns consumed by water and left in ruins – we’ve seen it before, and we’ll see it again. Despite the threat of devastation that floods pose for Iowans, surveillance of these natural disasters could soon be jeopardized.   Continue reading

On the Radio: Iowa’s runoff creates Gulf Coast “Dead Zone”


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Listen to this week’s radio clip on Iowa’s infamous contribution to the Dead Zone, which continues to plague the Gulf Coast Region.

Dead fish, damaged industry and dirty drinking water – Iowa is making a huge impact in the Gulf Coast region.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

That’s because of farm runoff. It doesn’t just pollute our rivers and streams; it flows down the Mississippi River and helps form the Dead Zone, which has plagued the Northern Gulf of Mexico for decades. Continue reading