Polar Vortex breaks Iowa cold records


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Temperatures dipped well below minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit in Iowa on Wednesday (flickr).

Julia Poska | January 31, 2019

Early Wednesday morning, while many across Iowa were still asleep, records were broken by the so-called “Polar Vortex” over the Midwest. Before 4 a.m. Des Moines saw a minus 20 degree temperature, making it the coldest Jan. 30 the city has seen in recent history. Waterloo got an even colder minus 24 degrees, breaking the same record in that city. Farther north, temperatures reached minus 29 degrees, as reported by the Des Moines Register.

Windchill made the cold temperatures feel even more brutal. In Cedar Rapids, windchill Wednesday morning reached minus 55 degrees, a tie with the 1985 record for the coldest windchill ever recorded there. According to the Registerwinds were steadily between 15 and 25 mph, but at times blew into the mid-30s.

Climate change and extreme cold

Some studies suggest that such extreme “Polar Vortex” events in the Midwest could become more common with climate change, though more research needs to be done to make a definitive call on the matter.

It appears that warmer arctic temperatures cause the jet stream, a westerly moving band of air circling the northern part of the globe, to dip farther south, bringing the North Pole’s extreme cold into the United States. Read this article from National Geographic for a more in-depth look at the science.

Frigid weather threatens Decorah eagle eggs


Photo by Brendon Lake, Flickr.
A bald eagle nest in Iowa.
Photo by Brendon Lake, Flickr.

This winter’s polar vortex is expected to generate subzero low temperatures and daytime temperatures hovering around ten degrees for over a week, threatening the Decorah eagle’s eggs.

The pair laid their first egg on Sunday and more are expected to arrive this week.

In order to keep the eggs from freezing, one of the parents will have to stay on the nest at all times.

To read more about the Decorah eggs in peril, head to the Gazette. Or, the eagle pair and their nest can be live streamed here.