National Weather Service Director to visit Iowa City


Dr. Louis W. Uccellini  earned his PhD in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has served as Director of the National Weather Service since 2013. (NOAA)
Dr. Louis W. Uccellini holds a PhD in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has served as Director of the National Weather Service since 2013. (NOAA)

Nick Fetty | October 14, 2014

National Weather Service (NWS) Director Louis W. Uccellini is will give a public seminar about how communities can better handle severe weather during his stop in Iowa City this week.

The presentation – “Building a Weather-Ready Nation: Advancing the NWS Hydrology Program” – will examine ways the NWS is building a network to better prepare communities for a range of natural disasters from drought and flooding to winter storms and hurricanes.

This will be followed up by a presentation from Don Cline, acting director of NWS Office of Hydrologic Development, entitled “Environmental Intelligence: Water 1.0 – The National Water Center and the Transformation of NOAA’s Water Prediction Services.” Cline will focus on how the NWS along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working with the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc. – which includes the University of Iowa as well as Iowa State University – to develop a water prediction network.

This two-part presentation is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. on October 15 in the Lehman Ballroom at Hotel Vitro and is open to the public. The two presentations will be followed up by a question and answer session with Dr. Uccellini and Dr. Cline.

Uccellini, Cline, and other members of the NWS will also visit the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) while on campus. NWS representatives will meet with staff from the IFC to discuss ways the two organizations can work together to better serve Iowa and the rest of the country.

Seminar Details

What: “Building a Weather-Ready Nation: Advancing the NWS Hydrology Program” presented by Louis W.Uccellini.

“Environmental Intelligence: Water 1.0 — The National Water Center and the Transformation of NOAA’s Water Prediction Services” presented by Don Cline.

When: Wednesday, Oct. 15, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Where: Hotel Vetro, Lehman Ballroom, 201 South Linn St., Iowa City.

Super Typhoon Haiyan Wreaking Havoc in the Philippines


Haiyan, known in the Philippines as Yolanda, retained much of its force as it moved westward with sustained winds of 295 kph (185 mph), which puts it well above the 252 kph threshold for a Category 5 hurricane, the highest category on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.

Meteorologists predicted that it would maintain super typhoon intensity throughout its passage over the Philippines. A super typhoon has surface winds that sustain speeds of more than 240 kph (150 mph) for at least a minute, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

To stay updated, head over to CNN.

Human-Caused Climate Change Linked to Extreme Weather


Aerial photos of New Jersey coastline in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy
Photo by US Navy

 

Human influences are having an impact on some extreme weather and climate events, according to the report “Explaining Extreme Events of 2012 from a Climate Perspective,” release by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

The report examined the causes of 12 extreme events that occurred on five continents and in the Arctic during 2012.

“This report adds to a growing ability of climate science to untangle the complexities of understanding natural and human-induced factors contributing to specific extreme weather and climate events,” said Thomas R. Karl, L.H.D, director of NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). “Nonetheless, determining the causes of extreme events remains challenging.”

To learn more about the study, head over to the NOAA’s synopsis.

Iowa’s Push for National Flood Center


Photo by greghauenstein; Flickr

Congressman Dave Loebsack has proposed a plan that will create a institution, much like the University of Iowa Flood Center, that will bring together academic institutions and federal agencies. The goal of the National Flood Center would be to better understand flooding and possibly prevent damage.  Continue reading

EPA, NOAA: May 2-May 6 is “Air Quality Awareness Week”


Credit: Señor Codo, Flickr

The EPA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have dedicated this week to air quality awareness.

This comes on the heels of a year in which Iowa exceeded federal air quality standards at a record clip due to stricter criteria. Iowa’s violations more than doubled between 2009 and 2010, as IEF reported in January and the Des Moines Register reported on Saturday. Continue reading