Derecho recovery continues with tree replanting, aid requests


Via Flickr.

Eleanor Hildebrandt | August 12, 2021

One year after the derecho devastated many Iowa communities, the state is still recovering.

The storm ripped through nearly 800 miles of the Midwestern United States and crossed eight states within 14 hours. Winds reached higher than 60 miles per hour across the region. With Tuesday marking the anniversary of the natural disaster, Iowans are looking forward after a year of rebuilding.

One of the hardest hit areas of Iowa, Cedar Rapids, is looking to replant some of the trees that were uprooted in the storm. Several trees in the area were removed by contractors because they were damaged, including early 20 percent of the city-owned trees. This led to a smaller diversity of species in the municipality. The Cedar Rapids Gazette reported on Tuesday that the city is still taking inventory of what trees were lost in the derecho. The city is hoping to finish the project by the end of 2021.

Cedar Rapids is currently looking to replant several species of trees, including the swamp white oak and Western catalpa trees. Post-derecho planting has officially begun in the city to continue recovering the landscape.

Alongside strides to return to pre-derecho Iowa, some elected officials from the state are looking to continue investing funds in recovery initiatives. The storm is the most costly inland weather disaster in the history of the United States, with an $11 million price tag. Iowa’s delegation in Washington are pushing for more funding to go to programs like Cedar Rapids’s tree planting.

How to environmentally dispose of electronic waste


Photo by U.S. Army Environmental Command

Ever wonder how to best dispose of your old electronics?

Many electronics should not be thrown out in the regular trash. Electronics often contain toxic chemicals that can enter the groundwater while sitting in landfills.

In fact, starting next year it will be illegal for Illinois residents to throw out electronics – there is no such ban in Iowa.

There are many recycling options for electronic waste. Often, manufacturers such as IBM and Apple will offer ways to recycle their computers and other products. Additionally, Midwest Electronic Recovery – an electronics recycling company – has two locations in Iowa (Walford and Clive).

For the full article on Illinois’ new electronic waste law, read the Quad-City Times article here.

For information on disposing of electronics in Iowa, and the harmful effects of throwing out electronics, visit the Iowa DNR’s webpage here.

Update: The EPA has even more suggestions on where to recycle electronic waste here.

It is also worthwhile to find out your city’s protocol for recycling electronics. Some cities in Iowa, including Iowa City, have some services available.