Energy-efficient homes come with radon risk


Photo by Birdies100, Flickr

Houses around the country are increasingly built with energy-efficiency in mind, but many people don’t realize that these measures can lead to higher in-home radon levels. Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer, accounting for the death of 21,000 Americans every year. New homes are typically built with tight seals in order to make them energy efficient. These tight seals don’t prevent the radon from entering, but do prevent it from escaping. KCRG-TV reports that this is a pertinent issue for Iowans as Iowa has the highest radon concentration in the U.S.:

Increasing numbers of Iowans are testing their homes for radon — an encouraging sign, advocates say. Yet radon levels have increased across much of Iowa as people place a greater value on tightly sealed, energy-efficient homes at the expense of indoor air quality. Radon still enters those homes through the ground, but it doesn’t escape.

“There are more homes now in need of radon mitigation than there were in the past,” said Bill Field, a University of Iowa researcher and author of several key studies linking radon and lung cancer. Continue reading