Iowa’s biggest solar power operation is under construction


Dubuque will soon be home to the largest solar power operation in Iowa. (zak zak/flickr)

Katelyn Weisbrod | June 21, 2017

Construction for the biggest solar power operation in the state is underway.

Alliant Energy is building 15,600 solar panels on 21 acres near Dubuque to produce enough energy to power 727 Iowa homes every year. The $10 million project should be up and running by August.

The energy company is working with the city of Dubuque and the Greater Dubuque Development Corporation to establish the operation. Another smaller solar site will be constructed closer to downtown Dubuque, and will have an educational component for visitors. The city of Dubuque has been a leader in sustainability in Iowa, and is a member of the Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities through the University of Iowa.

Alliant, which serves customers in Iowa and Wisconsin, already owns several renewable energy operations, including other solar projects, four wind farms, and a few hydroelectric dams.

“We see the cost of solar going down and the efficiency going up, and we anticipate more and more customers who demand renewable energy,” Alliant’s vice president of generation operations Terry Kouba said to the Associated Press. “Alliant will invest in more solar projects in the future, and we will look back at this Dubuque project and say, ‘This is where it began.'”

 

New Iowa solar bill looks to benefit municipal utilities, rural electric cooperatives


The sun sets over a field in Mount Vernon. (Rich Herrmann/Flickr)
The sun sets over a field in Mount Vernon. (Rich Herrmann/Flickr)

Nick Fetty | July 1, 2015

Last week Iowa governor Terry Branstad signed a bill that will likely create more opportunities for solar energy in the Hawkeye State.

House File 645 will allow for increased solar energy tax credits in the state and also add production tax credits for utility solar projects. The bill was passed by the Iowa House 88-4 before being approved 49-1 by the Senate. Branstad signed the bill on June 26.

The credit applies to solar arrays of less than 1.5 MW of capacity, meaning it is more likely to benefit municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives as opposed to investor-owned utility companies. The bill also increases the pool of tax credit funds from $4.5 million to $5 million.

“That’s good for the environment and our economy. Solar energy is already working for thousands of businesses, farmers and homeowners across our state,” Iowa Senator Rob Hogg (D-Cedar Rapids) said in a statement. In a recent guest column in the Iowa Daily Democrat, Hogg outlined the need for more emphasis on clean energy in Iowa and abroad.

Along with the solar energy bill, Branstad signed four others. The governor currently has 14 bills from the 2015 legislative session awaiting his approval. The deadline for signing these bills is July 15.

Solar power use in Iowa expected to grow


Nick Fetty | August 18, 2014
Solar farm in Spain. (Wikipedia)
Solar farm in Spain. (Wikipedia)

Solar energy use in the Iowa is expected to rise in coming years and much of it can be attributed to decreased installation and equipment costs.

The cost to produce energy using solar panels has deceased from 21.4 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in 2010 to 11.2 cents per kWh in 2013. The U.S. Department of Energy hopes this decreases to 6 cents per kWh by 2020 which is when solar energy is expected to become the world’s most inexpensive form of energy.

The Iowa Department of Revenue has awarded $ 1,280,243 in Iowa Solar Energy System Tax Credits in 2014. This is nearly double the 2012 figure of $ 650,914. A report by the Iowa Environmental Council ranks Iowa 16th nationally for potential of solar energy production and estimates that 20 percent of the state’s annual electricity needs could be met using rooftop solar grids.

Critics of solar power say the source’s reliability can be intermittent depending on sunlight availability and in California an increase in the number of solar plants has been detrimental for bird species in the state.

Iowa’s largest solar farm – expected to produce enough energy to power 120 homes – opened in Johnson County last month.

 

Large solar energy project proposed for Mitchell County in northern Iowa


Nick Fetty | July 3, 2014
Concentrated photovoltaics (CPV) solar farm in Canyon County, Idaho. Photo by Nicolas Morgan; Flickr
Concentrated photovoltaics (CPV) solar farm in Canyon County, Idaho.
Photo by Nicolas Morgan; Flickr

A $1.5 million solar array project – expected to be one of the largest in the state – has been proposed for Mitchell County in northern Iowa and is pending final approval from county officials.

The Heartland Power Cooperative will install 1,200 solar panels across 4 1/2 acres just east of St. Ansgar.  The cooperative has partnered with the National Renewable Cooperative Organization, National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corporation, and Federated Rural Electric Insurance Exchange for this project.

Construction is expected to be completed by late fall and the operation should be running by 2015.

Heartland Power Cooperative serves approximately 2,500 members in northern Iowa and southeastern Minnesota.

EDIT: Post originally stated project was finalized however it is in the “Request for Proposal” stage and has yet to receive final approval from county officials.

Experts discuss renewable energy opportunities at conference in Le Mars


Tiny Le Mars, Iowa played host last week to a group of energy experts. The theme of the occasion? Opportunities for investment in Iowa’s natural energy sources, like wind and sun.  Continue reading