Plea for Iowa to join U.S. Climate Alliance


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An Iowa wind farm extends as far as the eye can see. (News/flickr)

Jenna Ladd | February 16, 2018

President Trump decided to remove the United States from the Paris Climate Accord in September, and since then numerous U.S. governors have expressed their desire to stay in the treaty through the U.S. Climate Alliance.

The bi-partisan Climate Alliance is “committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions consistent with the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement.” Its members represent 40 percent of the total U.S. population and at least $7.4 trillion dollars in U.S. gross domestic product. Sixteen governors are members of the alliance currently, and a democrat in the Iowa House of Representatives is hoping to add Governor Reynolds to that list. Representative Charles Isenhart of Dubuque presented a letter to the Iowa Energy Center on Monday, asking that Iowa join the alliance. Isenhart also proposed a bill in the House of Representatives that would require Iowa’s membership in the U.S. Climate Alliance.

Isenhart said to The Register,“We’ve already done a lot and are doing a lot and have some of the mechanisms in place to do more. We should be joining if for no other reason than to take credit for what we’ve already done.” The state of Iowa leads the nation in wind energy production, and is expected to generate more than forty percent of its energy from the wind by 2020.

Julie Cerqueira is executive director of the U.S. Climate Alliance. She said in a letter,

“As I read the Iowa Energy Plan, it is clear that many of the state’s energy priorities align with the priorities of the Alliance — a focus on innovation, workforce development, modernizing our electrical grids and promoting the expansion of electric vehicles. Furthermore, Iowa’s long history of leadership in clean energy, in particular the successful deployment of wind power at scale, makes its membership in the U.S. Climate Alliance both logical and valuable.”

A spokesperson for Governor Reynolds says that the governor has not yet considered joining the U.S. Climate Alliance.

 

 

Experts discuss renewable energy opportunities at conference in Le Mars


Tiny Le Mars, Iowa played host last week to a group of energy experts. The theme of the occasion? Opportunities for investment in Iowa’s natural energy sources, like wind and sun.  Continue reading

Iowa may soon see nuclear power


 

Photo by Petr Adamek, Wikimedia Commons

A bill to incentivize construction of nuclear power plants will likely sail through the Iowa legislature, say supporters and opponents of the legislation.

The Cedar Rapids Gazette reports:

Bills introduced for study in the commerce subcommittees of the Iowa House and Senate provide broad support for nuclear power. They also set up a regulatory mechanism that would allow regulated utilities in Iowa to begin charging customers for the cost of nuclear power facilities while they are under construction.

Plans from the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate carbon dioxide emissions have breathed fresh life into the nation’s nuclear power industry, which saw little new construction for several decades until last year.

Currently, Iowa has just one nuclear power plant, 37-year-old Duane Arnold Energy Center near Palo.  Continue reading

Invest in solar energy to jumpstart Iowa’s economy


This letter, written by Sen. Joe Bolkcom – D, Iowa City, was also published in the February 24 edition of The Daily Iowan. Bolkcom, who is also the outreach and community education director for CGRER, is the sponsor of SF 99 – a bill that would incentivize solar energy use.

Imagine a readily available source of energy that could produce electricity for our homes and businesses, right where we live and work.

Solar energy could be the next new engine of job creation for Iowans, provided we seize the opportunities in front of us.

Iowa has become a world leader in biofuels and the big wind industry. This

Joe Bolkcom

is thanks to great natural resources (Sun, soils and wind) and smart state policies — and let’s not forget taxpayers, who have provided plenty of help in the form of public subsidies. Over the last decade, taxpayers have invested billions in these industries.

This investment has paid off by creating new jobs and new markets for Iowa products. Continue reading