Wind Production Tax Credit extended


Photo by kendoman26, Flickr.
Photo by kendoman26, Flickr.

The U.S. Senate approved a fiscal cliff budget package early Tuesday morning that would provide a one-year extension to the wind production tax credit.

If the U.S. House approves the deal, the tax credit would extend until the end of 2013 and include projects that begin construction this year.

“Overall, this is very, very good news for the wind industry and I think it will help us out,” said Harold Prior of Milford, executive director of the Iowa Wind Energy Association. Because projects begun this year will be eligible for the tax credit, the Senate’s provisions are basically a two-year extension because the work can be completed in 2014, he added.

For more information, read the full article at the Des Moines Register.

Controversial nuclear bill revived


Duane Arnold Energy Center, Iowa's lone nuclear source.

A controversial bill that outlines steps for MidAmerican Energy to build a nuclear power plant in Iowa was revived and approved today by a Senate subcommittee.

The bill, House File 561, failed to advance through the Senate last year.

Critics were angered by the legislation’s sudden resurrection.

“The nuclear industry and MidAmerican Energy specifically would have us believe that nuclear power is clean, safe and cheap when in actuality it is very dangerous and expensive,” said Mike Carberry, an Iowa member of Friends of the Earth, an environmental group based in Washington, D.C.

Advocates of the bill argued that this legislation will help Iowa avoid a potential energy crisis by diversifying the state’s energy sources.

“This bill represents just another piece of that journey to create a more diverse energy sources for our citizens of the state of Iowa,” said John Gilliland, senior vice president of government relations of the Iowa Association of Business and Industry.

The bill will be considered by a full committee on Tuesday, and must pass both the Senate and the House before it can be signed by Gov. Terry Branstad.

For more information, read the full article at the Des Moines Register.