Compromise met at the COP26, some say it isn’t enough


Via Flickr.

By Eleanor Hildebrandt | November 15, 2021

After two weeks in Glasgow, 200 countries adopted a document regarding climate policies and action at the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference.

The agreement includes agreements to reduce fossil fuel and coal subsidies, specifically calling for a “phase down.” John Kerry, U.S. special envoy for climate change, called fossil fuel subsidies the insanity at the meeting, calling for the rapid phase out of their use immediately.

The U.N. Secretary-General, António Guterres said more work needs to be done when it comes to the climate crisis. In a video address, he said the planet is fragile and “hanging by a thread,” as the world gets closer to a “climate catastrophe.”

Alongside other decisions, more than 100 world leaders—including the U.S. and China—committed to ending deforestation in the next nine years. COP26 President Alok Sharma told NBC News that this year’s summit was still an important stepping stone when it comings to climate change and global warming.

“We can now say with credibility that we have kept 1.5 degrees alive,” he said. “But its pulse is weak, and it will only survive if we keep our promises and translate commitments into rapid action.”

Climate activists, like Greta Thunberg, said the real conversation and work regarding climate change continues outside of meetings with governmental officials.

Jerry Schnoor Explains in a Video Why We are in a Climate Crisis


Josie Taylor | August 9, 2021

Jerry Schnoor, co-director of Global and Regional Environmental Research poses the question: Are we in a climate a crisis? Jerry explains why he believes we are with examples of climate tragedies around the world and more specifically Iowa. He talks about the affects on the Iowa derecho that will have happened one year ago tomorrow.

Jerry is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Iowa. He joined the University of Iowa college of engineering in 1977. Since then he has been a part of multiple research groups on campus. Jerry’s special fields of knowledge are water quality modeling, aquatic chemistry and climate change.

Climate Crises Occur Around the World


Via Flickr

Josie Taylor | July 25, 2021

Climate crises around the world are occurring. Last week Zhengzhou, China experienced catastrophic floods that accumulated the amount of rain normally expected in a year, in just 72 hours. Already 63 people have been found dead, and irreversible damage has been made on buildings, roads and houses. These floods are being called by some- once-in-a-thousand-year floods. 

China is not the only place experiencing flooding. Europe is also seeing deathly flooding in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. In Germany, at least 158 people are missing, and in Belgium 18 people are missing. These floods have killed at least 205 people in Europe. 

On the other end of crises, fires are rapidly destroying areas in Oregon and Canada. Oregon’s fire, which is being referred to as the Bootleg fire, is so far the third largest fire in United States history. 67 homes have been destroyed, and 2,500 people were advised to evacuate their area. 

In Canada, even more people were evacuated and entire villages have been burned. Two weeks ago, British Columbia declared a state of emergency. The wildfire smoke become so thick that many places in Canada issued air quality warnings. Those in areas not burning were still greatly affected. 

Iowa City releases new report on Climate Action Acceleration


Tyler Chalfant | November 19th, 2019

Photo from Alan Light, flickr

In August, Iowa City, motivated by student climate strikers, became the first city in Iowa to declare a climate crisis. The resolution updated the emissions goals set by the Climate Action and Adaptation Plan passed in 2018, and directed the City Manager’s Office to develop a report recommending ways to meet these new targets within 100 days. 

Last Friday, City Council released that report, which contains 64 initiatives to reduce carbon emissions in buildings, transportation, and waste, as well as to adapt to more volatile weather, and promote sustainable lifestyles. The greatest number of these initiatives are focused on increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy in buildings, which account for approximately 82% of emissions. 

The new targets set in August were based on a report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which claimed that human-caused emissions would net to be reduced by 45% from 2010 levels by 2030, and to reach net zero by 2050 in order to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. In Iowa City, that would require a minimum annual decrease of about 22,000 metric tonnes of carbon emissions. 


The report also includes recommendations of tax increases to fund incentive programs and public projects and education, as well as a partnership with MidAmerican Energy to install utility-scale solar panels. City Sustainability Coordinator Brenda Nations said that, while these goals are feasible, “the challenging thing is we need a lot of people on board to do it.” City Council will review the report and its recommendations at Tuesday evening’s work session.

Iowa Climate Statement 2019 released today with sobering extreme heat warnings


 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Julia Poska | September 18, 2019

Today top Iowa climate scientists released the Iowa Climate Statement 2019: Dangerous Heat Event Will Become More Frequent and Severe, warning Iowans and Midwesterners of the serious heat-related dangers the climate crisis is creating in our region.

Read the full statement here. Watch the press conference here.

The report has been backed by 216 faculty and researchers from 38 Iowa colleges and universities. Based on the most up‐to‐date scientific sources, the statement makes clear the urgency of preparing for dangerously hot summers in coming decades.

Highlights from the statement 

  • By midcentury, temperatures in Iowa will exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit 67 days per year, compared to a 23‐day average in recent decades.
  • By midcentury, the average daily high temperature for each year’s hottest five‐day period will be 98 degrees, compared to 92 degrees in recent decades.
  •  Once per decade, five‐day average high temperature will be 105 degrees.
  • Extreme heat is the leading weather‐related cause of death in the U.S.. Low‐income neighborhoods, the elderly, outdoor workers (especially construction and farm labor) and domestic animals are especially vulnerable.
  •  Confined livestock are at increased risk for death and widespread productivity loses. Producers will need to adjust their operations to deal with extreme heat events.
  • Adaptations to increasing heat waves will require expanded disaster preparedness, increased energy use and curtailment of outdoor work and recreation during times of extreme heat.

The UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research has released annual climate statements since 2011. These statements, vetted by Iowa’s top experts, place pivotal climate change research into an Iowa‐specific context, encouraging preparedness and resilience in the face of a climate crisis.

Read the full statement here. Watch the press conference here.