On the Radio- Budget cuts for Australia’s Department of Environment and Energy


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The melomys were the first mammalian extinction caused by global warming. (Alan C/flickr)

Eden DeWald | June 25, 2018

This week’s segment focuses on changes within the Australia Department of Environment and Energy.

Transcript:

Budget cuts threaten Australia’s ability to protect its endangered species.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Australia is home to over 7,000 native species, 506 of which are listed under the Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act. Australia’s Department of Environment and Energy is responsible for coming up with recovery plans for these endangered species, but federal budget cuts may hinder these plans.

The department is cutting up to sixty staff members, a move that draws concern from conservationists in Australia. Monitoring endangered species is an essential step in moving to protect them.

Endangered species that have a recovery plan fare better than ones that don’t. Biologist John Woinarski approved a recovery plan for the heavily endangered—and now extinct—Bramble Cay melomys, but the plan was never implemented. The melomys were the first mammalian extinction caused by global warming, and Australian environmentalists consider this to be a warning.

For more information, visit our website at iowa environmental focus dot org.

From the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

On the Radio: Iowa could lose crucial flood aid tools


 

2008 Iowa City flooding. Photo by Bethany Byers.

 

Listen to this week’s radio piece here.  It discusses the potential loss of some of Iowa’s crucial flood prevention tools.  Read the transcript below:

Towns consumed by water and left in ruins – we’ve seen it before, and we’ll see it again. Despite the threat of devastation that floods pose for Iowans, surveillance of these natural disasters could soon be jeopardized.   Continue reading