Changes in sea level could be more significant than ever before


Accelerated melting ice and changes in the global temperatures could cause the sea levels to rise| Photo by Jaymantri on Pexels.com

Sthefany Nóbriga| May 23, 2019

Due to the accelerated melting ice in Greenland and Antarctica, researchers believe that worldwide sea levels could increase much more than anticipated. 

On 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported that, global waters would rise by between 52cm and 98cm by 2100. However, a new study confirms that changes in the global temperatures could cause the sea levels to double or triple that amount.  

The IPCC report in 2013 only considered a 17-83% of the possibilities of sea level rising, where areas, this new study covers 5-95% estimates—which means this study looks at a broader range of results, according to BBC news. 

Researchers believe that if there are no significant reductions in emissions, we would see global waters rising between 62cm and 238cm by 2100. According to these studies, the earth could lose an equivalent area of land to 1.79 million square kilometers—approximately the size of Libya.

 If this becomes a reality, this could have severe implications to the planet, and hundreds of millions of people could be displaced. Many of the affected areas would be major cities such as London, New York, and Shanghai as well as large swathes of Bangladesh, where it will be nearly impossible for people to live in. 

Researchers remain hopeful and believe that there is still time to prevent these scenarios from occuring. The governments around the world must take action to inform the people and bring awareness to the rising levels of emissions.