University of Iowa flood Recovery


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University of Iowa campus flooded (flickr.)

Flash back to the 2008 flood that caused so much damage to the University of Iowa, here we are almost 11 years later and it looks like global warming is forcing us to get prepared for whatever may come our way.

Back in 1905, the university had been warned by landscape architects, not to build so close to the water, as it could cause problems, but the university was struggling to find land. Due to the flooding, over 20 building were affected on the university of Iowa campus. The flood made costly calls for change, causing the university to spend millions for the damages.

The flood of 2008 may not be the worst we have seen just yet, around the United States, floods, wild fires, hurricanes and other natural disasters have gradually become worse and caused mass devastation in different areas.

University of Iowa’s Don Guckert has been keeping the university safe and travelling the country to inform or educate other institutions about the disasters that occurred at the University of Iowa and how to be prepare for a natural disaster. He has gotten busier over the last five years as global warming has become a bigger issue as time passes.

We all know that its not easy to avoid but preparing for it can help save countless lives and heavy costs. University of Iowa is still rebuilding from the flooding that occurred.

Flooding bring disease filled mosquitoes to Western Iowa


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Mosquitoes that can bring disease.  (pexels).

Ayotoluwafunmi Ogunwusi | May 9th, 2019

Western Iowa has been suffering from flooding since march and some unwanted guests have flown in. Mosquitoes are very common insects the fly around during the summer period and according to new research from Iowa State University, western Iowa has the largest presence of mosquitoes carrying the west Nile virus.

The West Nile Virus can be transmitted by the Culex tarsalis, a type of mosquito. These mosquitoes usually gather and breed in pools of water and the flooding may have helped them gather is large amounts.

Iowa state professor and entomologist Ryan Smith believes that the virus is concerning as it is the leading cause of mosquito-born diseases in the United States.

The virus could affect one in five people bitten by the mosquito, and could lead people to develop fevers or potentially fatal diseases. The number of human cases in Iowa fluctuate every year, and scientists are still trying to find out the factors that influence yearly transmission rates.

There are many ways to prevent the disease, such as, by spraying insect repellent or wearing long sleeve shirts. This is the time of the year when the mosquitoes rise in number, early summer to early fall. The importance of our health and safety is number one.