Japanese beetles invading gardens and vineyards


Photo by Mike Bird on Pexels.com

By Julia Shanahan | July 26th, 2019

Japanese beetles are invading vineyards in Iowa in unexpected numbers, according to a report from The Des Moines Register.

The report said that about 50 to 60 percent of Iowa vineyards are spraying pesticides to prevent or combat Japanese beetles. The beetles like to chew on vines, grapes, and fruit trees, but are damaging flower beds in gardens and eating the foliage from trees and shrubs. 

The beetles lay their eggs underground, where the larvae can cause grass to wilt and turn brown. They are among one of the major pests in the Midwest, and cause great damage to crops each year. The bugs feed mostly on corn and soybean crops – two major crops in Iowa.

The beetle first arrived to the United States in the early 1900s. According to the Des Moines Register report, the Japanese beetle colony experienced a collapse in the winter of 2013-14, but have since been able to rebuild.

These beetles like to attack plants in groups, making damage more severe even though their life cycle is only 40 days. Spraying insecticides and being mindful of what you plant and where you plant it are some ways to prevent these beetles from eating up your garden. You can look at this list of the best and worst plants for Japanese beetles. 

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