Study shows states in the U.S. can expect more hot days


Photo by Jonathan Petersson on Pexels.com

By Julia Shanahan | July 18th, 2019

The number of Iowa’s heat index is above 90 degrees is expected to triple, bringing the average up to 64 days per year by mid-century and 92 days by the century’s end, according to a report from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Iowa’s heat index includes the temperature and humidity combined. This potentially lethal heat is caused by climate change, according to the study. These heat increased will affect other states across the country as well.

The study says that if there is no action to reduce carbon emissions, then by the end of the century Florida and Texas could experience the equivalent of about five months per year where the average temperature “feels like” its above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, with most days surpassing 105 degrees. The study said that some southern states could experience temperatures that would exceed the upper-limit of the National Weather Service heat index scale, causing potential, and unprecedented, health risks.

By mid-century, the study found that 401 U.S. cities, places with more than 50,000 residents, would experience an average of about a month or more a year where temperatures surpass 90 degrees Fahrenheit, compared to the usual 239 cities. More than 6 million people would experience “off-the-charts” heat days for about a week or more on average. Overall, the study showed that the Southeast and Southern Great Plains will experience the worst of these effects.


Iowa is experiencing a heat index value of 110 degrees Fahrenheit this week. According to the UCS, heat related injuries can happen at temperatures above 90 degrees, making small children and elderly the most susceptible.  

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